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Black Sash
Title: Black Sash
Title alternative: Making Human Rights Real
URL: http://www.blacksash.org.za
Creator: Black Sash
Abstract: Sash, originally published as Black Sash, is a detailed record of the activities of the Black Sash organisation: the petitions, protests, marches, vigils, press releases and Conference papers which reflect the modus operandi of their desire to bring about change in the legislation which was, in their opinion, discriminatory and the cause of untold human suffering, hardship and poverty. Issues such as the Pass Laws, migrant labour, forced removals, indefinite detention without trial, Group Areas Act, the Bantu Education Act and in later years land reform were all brought to the attention of the apathetic public in an attempt to mount pressure against the Government to bring about a change in policy. The Black Sash acted as a constant reminder to the white electorate conscience that complacency would not effect change and action was necessary. The journal reflects the detailed efforts of these women from two aspects. The first one being the practical way in which the Black Sash Advice Offices helped hundreds of Africans experiencing problems as a direct result of the unjust Pass Laws. The second aspect was contained in their well documented and researched reporting on current political situations, State legislation and the effects thereof and other issues which they felt ought to be changed. [according to site editor`s information]
Keywords: Womens organizations; Human rights organizations; South Africa; health policy; Human Rights; social policy; election
Countries: South Africa
Subject areas: Politics » Domestic Affairs;
Politics » Human Rights & Law;
Society » Social Policy;
Health » Health Policy
Location of the site's editor: South Africa
Resource type: Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO);
Single Journals and Annuals (with fulltext)
Language: English
Notice: Erscheinungsweise: Online- und Druckausgabe
Erster Jahrgang: 1960
Letzter Jahrgang: 1994
Kosten: kostenlos
© Virtuelle Fachbibliothek Afrika (ilissAfrica)
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